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Fashion and Folly, or Strawberry Hill in Satire Dress’d

To celebrate the completion of her practice-based PhD in fashion curation Dr. Jenna Rossi-Camus will present a performance lecture that shares her proposal for a site-responsive exhibition at Horace Walpole’s Strawberry Hill House.

Jenna Rossi Camus crouching on floor in front of gothic window with large pieces of paper with illustrations relating to PhD lecture laid out

Jenna Rossi Camus at Strawberry Hill House.

The proposal, comprised of an extra-illustrated book and letter to Horace Walpole himself will be presented through word and image and the unique hand-made book will be available for guests to view. The lecture will conclude with an insight into the timeline of the research process, showing how the work has been both rigorous and innovative while presenting one of the project’s methodological documents.

3 July 2019, 6.30pm – 8pm. The lecture will be followed by a glass of wine.

For more information and to book visit our LCF events page.

Read about Jenna’s research.

Read more posts by Dr Jenna Rossi Camus.

 

Motive / Motif: Artists commemorate the Suffragettes

“.. the whole difference is the difference of motive …. & I contend that if you recognise the motive you should also recognise the provocation.” 
Suffragette, Frances Parker (1875-1924)
To mark the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 1918 Representation of the People Act twenty renowned and emerging artists were invited to each create an image which was embroidered onto a handkerchief, by London College of Fashion’s specialist embroidery technicians, to mark women’s suffrage.

Embroidered handkerchief with gold and mauve embroidered words in a repeating pattern "Women inspiring women". Photo: Peter Abrahams

Mona Hatoum embroidered handkerchief. Photo: Peter Abrahams

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Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities

CfFC’s Jeff Horsley worked on Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities Fondazione Zegna / San Patrignano and Making for Change, a Site-specific installation for State of Fashion 2018.

The project is a collaborative initiative that involves the community members of San Patrignano, supported by Fondazione Zegna, and participants in London College of Fashion’s (LCF) Making for Change project.

San Patrignano, located in Northern Italy, is a community promoting the rehabilitation of young people affected by substance misuse. Supported by Fondazione Zegna, San Patrignano enables young individuals to transform themselves through education and the acquisition of craftsmanship skills.

Making for Change is London College of Fashion’s training and manufacturing unit based at HMP Downview women’s prison. The project aims to increase well-being and reduce reoffending rates amongst participants by equipping them with professional fashion-related skills and qualifications within a supportive environment.

Setting up for exhibition

Layers, Holly Sibley 1st Year BA Menswear

If it was, Yubin Meng 1st Year BA Menswear

This project promotes the effectiveness of two social facilities, namely a therapeutic community and a prison to support rehabilitation and introduces young designers to fashion as a means for personal development and social change. Working with menswear designer and LCF graduate Bethany Williams, women in the weaving workshop of San Patrignano created innovative textile samples from industrial waste materials, textile fibres, plastic tapes and electrical wires by using traditional handlooms. These textile samples inspired LCF students to design garments and accessories reflecting contemporary issues, including ‘protect’, ‘migrate’, ‘protest’ and ‘survive’. Six garments incorporating fabrics woven at San Patrignano have been produced at LCF’s workshops. The accessories designed by the students will be interpreted by the women at HMP Downview out of the fabrics woven in San Patrignano.

Earlier in the project, decorative neckpieces were made by the women at HMP Downview as gifts for the women in San Patrignano who, in turn, made purses from hand-woven fabrics for the women at HMP Downview. The women wrote accompanying messages with each gift as a way to communicate and connect with each other.

The T-shirt: curating its narrative

Video interview with Jenna Rossi-Camus

By: Annabel Hoyng – van der Meijden, MA Fashion Curation

16 April 2018

How do you create a fashion exhibition with t-shirts? For curator Jenna Rossi-Camus, it’s all about 21st century style curating: “The keyword is conversation”. Watch the video to find out more.

About

London’s Fashion and Textile Museum’s current exhibition T-SHIRT: CULT – CULTURE – SUBVERSION tells the story of the most affordable and popular item of clothing on the planet. The exhibition looks at how t-shirts are both personal and universal communicators.

More info

T-SHIRT: CULT – CULTURE – SUBVERSION: from 9 February 2018 – 6 May 2018. For more information see the website of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

Click for a profile of Jenna Rossi Camus

Read more about Jenna’s research

Queer Looks in the Museum

Zoe is one of a group of young volunteers working on the  Queer Looks oral history project which is collecting stories and clothing from LGBTQ+ communities in Sussex, garments which will be displayed at Brighton Museum as part of an exhibition of the same name.  Here she is talking  about her experiences on the project.  

“Being involved in an exhibition for Brighton Museum looking at the last 50 years of LGBTQ+ dress, was a very exciting prospect. Historical dress and LGBTQ+ history is a combination that I’d not encountered in a museum before. As a group of young people from Brighton, we brought an accumulation of various backgrounds and experiences, eager to help shape this project and work on our ideas for what the  ‘Queer Looks’ exhibition would achieve. The continuing thought process throughout agreed upon essential goals like making the exhibition valid and authentic. Also importantly, properly communicating the stories of the people kind enough to tell them. I felt that this project could potentially be challenging yet exciting to work on as it would reflect the stories from within the community.

The Queer Looks Young Project Team at their pop up ‘look book studio’ promoting the forthcoming display. Brighton Museum, March 2018.

Initial tours around relevant exhibitions, a trip to the fashion stores and a variety of workshops gave us a real insight into what it takes to put on a fashion display. We focused in particular on how to use social media to promote our work, oral history interview techniques and photographic skills, giving us a thorough foundation for interviewing older members of the LGBTQ+ community across Sussex. I personally enjoyed learning about museum curation in the context of a fashion display and the logistics of translating oral histories through exhibiting people’s donated clothes and their stories told. Along the way we also learned a bit about things such as conservation issues, archives, informed consent and overall limitations and freedoms. It was apparent that curating a successful exhibition takes more work than I initially thought given the behind the scenes work, both collaboratively and individually for every item that goes on public display.

During the conducting of oral histories, we gathered the stories of people living in Brighton and Sussex. This was by far my favourite part of the project as this required us to speak to individuals in our own community from as vast a range of people as possible who all identify as LGBTQ+. The interviews gave us an opportunity to ask people about the meaning of dress to them and to talk about their donated outfit. I found it so insightful that people have an endlessly different experiences from one another and that dress can mean so many things to different people. The importance of it can range from outward fashion expression, to capturing someone’s true identity. This is what gave the project’s significant context, that behind the exhibition being curated, the outfits weren’t just a donation, they had a meaning and a story.

This experience has given me insight into the procedure for researching and selecting garments for display as well as gathering oral histories, alongside skills such as social media and marketing.  I feel that the work put in so far from the young project team promises to deliver an authentic and impactful exhibition.”

Queer Looks is part of Wear it Out, an HLF-funded project with Brighton Museum and London College of Fashion.

MA18 – MA Fashion Curation Course graduate show

The work of MA Fashion Curation graduates is being exhibited at the Bargehouse Gallery, behind the Oxo Tower on London’s South Bank. For their final project, students were asked to produce a hypothetical exhibition which were displayed alongside a collection of the work by the Centre for Fashion Curation. The show is open daily 15 – 18 February, 2018. Well done MA FC!

MA Fashion Curation display, MA18, The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

 

MA Fashion Curation display, MA18, The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

 

Model of hypothetical exhibition. By Susannah Shubin. MA Fashion Curation display, MA18, The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

 

Model of hypothetical exhibition. Conventionality Is Deadness: Art and Performance in the Wardrobe of Lady Ottoline Morrell, By Gill MacGregor. MA Fashion Curation display, MA18, The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

MA Fashion Curation display, MA18, The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

 

MA Fashion Curation display, MA18, The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

MA Fashion Curation display. The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

 

MA Fashion Curation display, MA18, The Bargehouse, London, February 2018.

 

Interested in studying Fashion Curation at London College of Fashion? Find out more about applying here.

Find out more more about Gill MacGregor’s work here in LCF’s  Graduate Spotlight post

 

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