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MA Fashion Curation vitrine displays

The vitrine outside the Cafeteria in John Prince’s Street site offers MA Fashion Curation and PhD curation students the opportunity to explore exhibition ideas in a physical space. It’s a testing ground, where curators put theory into practice and experiment with creative solutions. The vitrine is looked after by the Fashion Space Gallery in collaboration with the Centre for Fashion Curation.  Recent themes include: ‘Desire’ an installation that explores religious fetishism; Club Minijupe, an exhibit devoted to Françoise Hardy, one of the premiere Yé-yé singers; and an interactive display exploring the relationship between textiles and technology exhibited in collaboration with the Digital Anthropology Lab, pictured here.

The vitrine in John Prince’s Street

Marrying digital textile fabrication techniques and curatorial strategies, Techtile Jungle examines the difference between animation and automation. Made of silicone, lace, and nylon mesh and equipped with sensors, these objects are brought to life – sometimes unnoticed – when a passerby’s movement is detected.

Animate pincushion creatures by Digital Anthropology Lab, London College of Fashion.

The vitrine project was an extension of Alice Chen’s Collaborative Unit ‘Active Programmable Matter’. Joined by fellow MA Fashion Curation student Pearline Yeo, they began the project in March this year.  Maria Dada, Co-Coordinator of the LCF Digital Anthropology Lab, led the experimentation in creating the animated objects, with an intention of giving an innovative response to ‘active programming’.

Curated by Alice Chen and Pearline Yeo, MA Fashion Curation.

Special thanks to Maria Dada and Ragnar Hrafnkelsson from the Digital Anthropology Lab.

Read more about a selection of  vitrine projects here.

 

 

A Short Novel on Men’s Fashion, Olivier Saillard

Clothing the masculine body in the past 300 years has been in turns ornate and somber, sometimes constructed for leisure but nearly always for function. In his latest exhibition in conjunction with the Fondazione Pitti Immagine Discovery, ROMANZO BREVE DI MODA MASCHILE (A Short Novel on Men’s Fashion), Olivier Saillard proposes that after centuries of sartorial bondage, finally, menswear is free.

The temporary exhibition is installed at Palazzo Pitti Museo della Moda e del Costume: Florence’s (and Italy’s) growing permanent collection of fashion. On display are menswear garments donated and purchased for the collection from key designers who have shown at the fashion trade show Pitti Uomo in the past 30 years.

In his opening treatise, unfurled like an oversized manuscript in the foyer of the exhibition Saillard writes that, until the mid 20th century, men had to “conform to the authority” bestowed upon them, donning “inflexible trousers” which meant that “man could not swagger”. In the following 19 rooms he uses literary quotes, historical garments from the museum collection, and selections from the Uffizi’s Gallery of Modern Art to offer a direct riposte to this suggested rigidity.

Saillard has focused on injecting movement into unworn clothing, reinstalling the kineticism of life into garments removed from the body, without the aid of traditional mannequins. The result in A Short Novel on Men’s Fashion is that someone has just left the room; a half-crumpled suit displayed on the floor, a pair of trousers thrown over a rail, wrinkles intact. This doesn’t imply a lack of care (though Saillard does directly quote F. Scott Fitzgerald’s scene of carelessly thrown bespoke shirts in his novel The Great Gatsby) but rather the speed with which contemporary menswear can be shucked and left behind for the next big piece. Set against the glass cases holding 18th and 19th century frock coats, it places these contemporary garments firmly in the here and now, while also considering whether they will ever be deemed fit to be enclosed in a reverential casing of their own.

It is immediately poetic to place menswear, not traditionally held up as examples of fashion in the way of womenswear, on display in the ornate silk covered walls of a former Medici palace. However, one of the more affecting aspects of this exhibition comes from the modern paintings selected to hang among the clothing. Often on a side wall, obscured by the garments or mounts, there are some beautiful portraits of men wearing the clothing that Saillard suggests limited the male experience of the world. This includes the arresting Portrait of Piero Milani (1914) by Massimiliano Corcos. Staring with a smirk at the visitor, hands thrust in the pockets of his fashionable suit, Milani’s overcoat and hat are tossed on the table behind him, his glove has fallen to the ground.

This vivid portrayal of the push-pull of dressing the modern masculine body (projecting a refined image while simultaneously challenging the notion of vanity) encapsulates what Saillard outlines in his opening words yet could pass almost unnoticed in competition with the clothing, cases and book-shaped mounts filling the same room.

With A Short Novel on Men’s Fashion, Olivier Saillard proposes to show how the past 30 years has seen the emancipation of menswear, freeing it from the strictures of formality and embracing the multitudes of masculine experience. While there is a debate to be had about how limited, exactly, men have been by their clothing, the strength of this exhibition is in showcasing the vitality of menswear and channeling the perpetual forward momentum of design.

ROMANZO BREVE DI MODA MASCHILE
[A SHORT NOVEL ON MEN’S FASHION]
1989-2019: Thirty years of menswear as seen by Pitti Uomo
Florence – Palazzo Pitti
(Sale della galleria del Costume, Sale Contini Bonacossi)
11 June – 29 September 2019

Curated by Olivier Saillard

Text and images by Cyana Madsen

Fashion and Folly, or Strawberry Hill in Satire Dress’d

To celebrate the completion of her practice-based PhD in fashion curation Dr. Jenna Rossi-Camus will present a performance lecture that shares her proposal for a site-responsive exhibition at Horace Walpole’s Strawberry Hill House.

Jenna Rossi Camus crouching on floor in front of gothic window with large pieces of paper with illustrations relating to PhD lecture laid out

Jenna Rossi Camus at Strawberry Hill House.

The proposal, comprised of an extra-illustrated book and letter to Horace Walpole himself will be presented through word and image and the unique hand-made book will be available for guests to view. The lecture will conclude with an insight into the timeline of the research process, showing how the work has been both rigorous and innovative while presenting one of the project’s methodological documents.

3 July 2019, 6.30pm – 8pm. The lecture will be followed by a glass of wine.

For more information and to book visit our LCF events page.

Read about Jenna’s research.

Read more posts by Dr Jenna Rossi Camus.

 

Motive / Motif: Artists commemorate the Suffragettes

“.. the whole difference is the difference of motive …. & I contend that if you recognise the motive you should also recognise the provocation.” 
Suffragette, Frances Parker (1875-1924)
To mark the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 1918 Representation of the People Act twenty renowned and emerging artists were invited to each create an image which was embroidered onto a handkerchief, by London College of Fashion’s specialist embroidery technicians, to mark women’s suffrage.

Embroidered handkerchief with gold and mauve embroidered words in a repeating pattern "Women inspiring women". Photo: Peter Abrahams

Mona Hatoum embroidered handkerchief. Photo: Peter Abrahams

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Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities

CfFC’s Jeff Horsley worked on Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities Fondazione Zegna / San Patrignano and Making for Change, a Site-specific installation for State of Fashion 2018.

The project is a collaborative initiative that involves the community members of San Patrignano, supported by Fondazione Zegna, and participants in London College of Fashion’s (LCF) Making for Change project.

San Patrignano, located in Northern Italy, is a community promoting the rehabilitation of young people affected by substance misuse. Supported by Fondazione Zegna, San Patrignano enables young individuals to transform themselves through education and the acquisition of craftsmanship skills.

Making for Change is London College of Fashion’s training and manufacturing unit based at HMP Downview women’s prison. The project aims to increase well-being and reduce reoffending rates amongst participants by equipping them with professional fashion-related skills and qualifications within a supportive environment.

Setting up for exhibition

Layers, Holly Sibley 1st Year BA Menswear

If it was, Yubin Meng 1st Year BA Menswear

This project promotes the effectiveness of two social facilities, namely a therapeutic community and a prison to support rehabilitation and introduces young designers to fashion as a means for personal development and social change. Working with menswear designer and LCF graduate Bethany Williams, women in the weaving workshop of San Patrignano created innovative textile samples from industrial waste materials, textile fibres, plastic tapes and electrical wires by using traditional handlooms. These textile samples inspired LCF students to design garments and accessories reflecting contemporary issues, including ‘protect’, ‘migrate’, ‘protest’ and ‘survive’. Six garments incorporating fabrics woven at San Patrignano have been produced at LCF’s workshops. The accessories designed by the students will be interpreted by the women at HMP Downview out of the fabrics woven in San Patrignano.

Earlier in the project, decorative neckpieces were made by the women at HMP Downview as gifts for the women in San Patrignano who, in turn, made purses from hand-woven fabrics for the women at HMP Downview. The women wrote accompanying messages with each gift as a way to communicate and connect with each other.

The T-shirt: curating its narrative

Video interview with Jenna Rossi-Camus

By: Annabel Hoyng – van der Meijden, MA Fashion Curation

16 April 2018

How do you create a fashion exhibition with t-shirts? For curator Jenna Rossi-Camus, it’s all about 21st century style curating: “The keyword is conversation”. Watch the video to find out more.

About

London’s Fashion and Textile Museum’s current exhibition T-SHIRT: CULT – CULTURE – SUBVERSION tells the story of the most affordable and popular item of clothing on the planet. The exhibition looks at how t-shirts are both personal and universal communicators.

More info

T-SHIRT: CULT – CULTURE – SUBVERSION: from 9 February 2018 – 6 May 2018. For more information see the website of the Fashion and Textile Museum.

Click for a profile of Jenna Rossi Camus

Read more about Jenna’s research

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