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MA Fashion Curation vitrine displays

The vitrine outside the Cafeteria in John Prince’s Street site offers MA Fashion Curation and PhD curation students the opportunity to explore exhibition ideas in a physical space. It’s a testing ground, where curators put theory into practice and experiment with creative solutions. The vitrine is looked after by the Fashion Space Gallery in collaboration with the Centre for Fashion Curation.  Recent themes include: ‘Desire’ an installation that explores religious fetishism; Club Minijupe, an exhibit devoted to Françoise Hardy, one of the premiere Yé-yé singers; and an interactive display exploring the relationship between textiles and technology exhibited in collaboration with the Digital Anthropology Lab, pictured here.

The vitrine in John Prince’s Street

Marrying digital textile fabrication techniques and curatorial strategies, Techtile Jungle examines the difference between animation and automation. Made of silicone, lace, and nylon mesh and equipped with sensors, these objects are brought to life – sometimes unnoticed – when a passerby’s movement is detected.

Animate pincushion creatures by Digital Anthropology Lab, London College of Fashion.

The vitrine project was an extension of Alice Chen’s Collaborative Unit ‘Active Programmable Matter’. Joined by fellow MA Fashion Curation student Pearline Yeo, they began the project in March this year.  Maria Dada, Co-Coordinator of the LCF Digital Anthropology Lab, led the experimentation in creating the animated objects, with an intention of giving an innovative response to ‘active programming’.

Curated by Alice Chen and Pearline Yeo, MA Fashion Curation.

Special thanks to Maria Dada and Ragnar Hrafnkelsson from the Digital Anthropology Lab.

Read more about a selection of  vitrine projects here.

 

 

Dressing the Self/Other

Dressing the Self/Other is a reflective piece by Matteo Augello that explores dress performance and re-enactment and their use as research tools and crucial elements in the teaching of fashion history. Augello is a PhD student at the Centre for Fashion Curation at London College of Fashion and a former freelance researcher for the V&A opera exhibition in 2017.  Based on a video clip of his performance-lecture on ’The Art of the Prima Donna’, He will start off this interdisciplinary conversation on the topic of dress and performance by discussing some of his work on dress in Italian Opera.

Visit the Crassh page for more information and booking.

Dressing the Self/Other flier advertising the event at the University of Cambridge 5.30pm - 7.30pm 27 November 2018. Text giving summary. Red header and footer.

Dressing the Self/Other, 5.30pm – 7.30pm 27 November 2018

Read more about Matteo Augello’s research How Italian fashion is collected, preserved and analysed: unfolding the relationship between scholarship and production in the establishment of fashion collections in Italy, 1995-2015.

More posts from Matteo Augello

Pink – exhibition review

Pink: the History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color explores the colour pink and its multitude shades and cultural meanings. Organized by Dr Valerie Steele, Director, The Museum at FIT, Pink interrogates the history, materiality and cultural meanings of a colour that, as the exhibition guide points out, ‘provokes exceptionally strong feelings of both attraction and repulsion.’

Pink. Installation view. Image © Jeffrey Horsley courtesy The Museum at FIT

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Eckhaus Latta: Possessed

Eckhaus Latta was established in 2011 by Mike Eckhaus and Zoe Latta is a US-based bi-coastal, collaborative creative practice. Eckhaus Latta: Possessed is the duo’s exhibition and first solo venture, debuting at the Whitney Museum of American Art in August 2018.

Mike Eckhaus and Zoe Latta met as students at Rhode Island School of Design. They set up Eckhaus Latta in 2011 and the brand, based in Los Angeles and New York and known for collaborations with artists, musicians and designers, reflects an increasing trend for practices that operate between the worlds of fashion and art.

Four colour projections displayed in Eckhaus LattaL Posessed exhibition space leaning against the wall containing a photograph close up of a women's face, a full length shot of a woman, a torso and head shot of a women and a foot in a sock standing on a ball.

Eckhaus Latta: Possessed. View of installation. Image © Jeff Horsley

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Homo Faber: Fashion Inside and Out

Judith Clark has curated Homo Faber: Fashion Inside and Out part of an inaugural event at the Fondazione Giorgio Cini in Venice showcasing European craftsmanship.  The exhibition, which took place in the spectacular space of the disused Gandini swimming pool, took as its theme how traditional techniques inspire contemporary design and exhibition-making.

Cream calico covered unclothed mannequin in diving pose with splash effect in exhibition space of disused swimming pool with mannequins in the background.

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SpiceUp Review

As the field of fashion curation rapidly expands past the walls of the museum and gallery and into corporate headquarters and shopfronts, it has now conquered a new frontier; the Islington Business Design Centre in London. A space more commonly known for trade shows and recruitment events, for three steamy weeks this summer the location played host to the exhibition SpiceUp. Subtitled “An Exhibition About The Spice Girls” (lest there be any confusion about the subject of the show), this exhibit was an exercise in curatorial agony and visitor ecstasy.

The Spice Girls were a group of five British women, who auditioned to become a pop group in 1994, and ended up becoming a cultural zeitgeist. SpiceUp has been curated without any affiliation with the group or their management, and is a testament to their lasting legacy. Spread over two floors in a side wing of the former Royal Agricultural Hall, there is no context provided for the location, other than the assumption that there are surely few venues in London built to accommodate such a massive assemblage of clothing, ephemera and merchandise, that would also avail themselves for hire to a member of the public. And so SpiceUp curator Alan Smith-Allison is – albeit one who is responsible for collecting the bulk of the objects on display, and owner of the largest collection of Spice Girls memorabilia on earth. A former charity worker turned exhibition maker, Smith-Allison has collected anything and everything Spice Girls-related since 2007, and in curating and staging this exhibit himself, also brought in loaned objects from fellow fans.

The result is almost overwhelming. With over 7000 pieces of ephemera on display, the exhibition reveals how deeply the public travelled into the mercantile heart of darkness in the Spice era. For the purposes of this review, however, my focus is on the dress and its display

Spice Girls memorabilia on display at SpiceUp.  Photo Cyana Madsen 2018 web

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