Tag: Digital Anthropology Lab

MA Fashion Curation vitrine displays

The vitrine outside the Cafeteria in John Prince’s Street site offers MA Fashion Curation and PhD curation students the opportunity to explore exhibition ideas in a physical space. It’s a testing ground, where curators put theory into practice and experiment with creative solutions. The vitrine is looked after by the Fashion Space Gallery in collaboration with the Centre for Fashion Curation.  Recent themes include: ‘Desire’ an installation that explores religious fetishism; Club Minijupe, an exhibit devoted to Françoise Hardy, one of the premiere Yé-yé singers; and an interactive display exploring the relationship between textiles and technology exhibited in collaboration with the Digital Anthropology Lab, pictured here.

The vitrine in John Prince’s Street

Marrying digital textile fabrication techniques and curatorial strategies, Techtile Jungle examines the difference between animation and automation. Made of silicone, lace, and nylon mesh and equipped with sensors, these objects are brought to life – sometimes unnoticed – when a passerby’s movement is detected.

Animate pincushion creatures by Digital Anthropology Lab, London College of Fashion.

The vitrine project was an extension of Alice Chen’s Collaborative Unit ‘Active Programmable Matter’. Joined by fellow MA Fashion Curation student Pearline Yeo, they began the project in March this year.  Maria Dada, Co-Coordinator of the LCF Digital Anthropology Lab, led the experimentation in creating the animated objects, with an intention of giving an innovative response to ‘active programming’.

Curated by Alice Chen and Pearline Yeo, MA Fashion Curation.

Special thanks to Maria Dada and Ragnar Hrafnkelsson from the Digital Anthropology Lab.

Read more about a selection of  vitrine projects here.

 

 

Talking Heads

Jeff Horsley, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Fashion Curation has recently collaborated with Holly Shaw from LCF’s Digital Anthropology Lab on an innovative project for the exhibition Gluck: Art & Identity, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, 18 November 2017 to 11 March 2018.

Following a successful production for recent exhibition Present Imperfect at Fashion Space Gallery, LCF, for which Holly and Jeff realised a life-size 3D scan of dancer Ed Mitton milled into the base of a display case, their current work focusses on a digital rendering of the artist Gluck, subject of the Brighton exhibition.

 

Present Imperfect: a life-size 3D milled impression of a dancer was used as a background for display of a contemporary dance costume from Rambert.

Renowned for dressing in masculine clothing with barbered hair, Gluck presented a singular image in portraits, self-portraits and studio photographs. Regularly posed in profile, eyes down-cast, Gluck’s distinctive pose reads like a trademark.

Gluck

 Gluck

Jeff and Holly have aimed to represent Gluck in the exhibition with a mannequin prosthetic inspired by the artist’s self-image. Sculpted by Holly from photographs of Gluck, a life-size 3D printed rendering of the artist will be mounted on one of the mannequins in the exhibition. Rather than a hyper-realistic depiction, Holly referred to images of art deco sculpture and decorative art objects to produce a formalized image of the artist. This stylisation is intended to reflect the artist’s self-stylised attitude. The prosthetic has been printed in a plaster and resin medium to enhance its sculptural appearance. A cut-away to the back of the skull is intended to exaggerate the prosthetic’s artificiality and it’s digital rendering.

Digital rendering of the head of the Artist Gluck by Holly Shaw, Digital Anthropology Lab at LCF

Side view digital rendering of the head of the Artist Gluck by Holly Shaw, Digital Anthropology Lab at LCF.

The finished head arrives at Brighton Museum

Jeff Horsley fitting the head on to the mannequin.

 

Gluck: Art and Identity 18 November 2017 to 11 March 2018
Brighton Museum

Read more about the project on the Centre for Fashion Curation pages

Part of Wear it Out, the HLF-funded collaboration with Brighton Museum

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